Our Indian Empire; Its History and Present State, from the Earliest Settlement of the British in Hindostan, to the Close of the Year 1846 Volume 1

Our Indian Empire; Its History and Present State, from the Earliest Settlement of the British in Hindostan, to the Close of the Year 1846 Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...friend and schoolfellow Impey presided. The judges, after a long examination of the case, made Nuncomar and Fowke give bail, and bound over the governor-general to prosecute them for a conspiracy. Immediately afier this General Clavering, Colonel Monson, and Mr. Francis made a visit of honour to Nuncomar, a compliment which had never been paid him before either by them selves or by the members of any preced ing administration. But on the 11th of March, a month previous to his appearance before the judges, and a week or ten days previous to the visit of the native witness to Hastings, the great informer had accused the governor-general of procuring the acquittal of Mohammed Reza Khan and Shitab Boy for large sums of money; and had further accused him of accepting or extorting more than three millions and a half of rupees for the appointment of the Begum and of Nuncomar' s own son Goordass. These charges had all the wildness of an Oriental fiction; but the majority had not only determined that they should be discussed, but had even, upon evidence which ought not to have been allowed to injure the character of a dog, declared Hastings guilty of one fraction of them, and called upon him to refund two lacs of rupees, not, however, to the Begum at Moorshedabad, from whom it was said he had received them, but to the company's treasury at Calcutta! The visit of the trio was intended to support--what the mighty Himalaya itself could not have propped up--the character and veracity of Nuncomar, and to intimate that the governor-general's proceedings with the judges were intended to get rid of a troublesome witness whom Hastings had refused to meet in the council-chamber, or to answer. The war was thus widened, inasmuch as the...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 220 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236866363
  • 9781236866363