Our Country's Future; Or, Great National Questions as Viewed by the Most Prominent Editors and Corroborated by Eminent Men of Our Country, Including President Harrison, Ex-President Cleveland and Scores of Others, Concerning Marriage and

Our Country's Future; Or, Great National Questions as Viewed by the Most Prominent Editors and Corroborated by Eminent Men of Our Country, Including President Harrison, Ex-President Cleveland and Scores of Others, Concerning Marriage and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...upon a period of restriction and regulation. The people have now to learn to subdue and control these great Frankensteins of their own creation. As Mr. Frederick Taylor, President of the Western National Bank of New York, who has all his life been a close student of the railway question, says: "Though the railroads have probably contributed more_ than all other agencies combined to make the United States what they are, no one will deny that the incalculable benefit which we have derived from their growth and development has not been, and is not, wholly ' unmixed of evil.' Leaving out other considerations, it is not unfair to say that three-quarters of all the legislative corruption from which we have suffered during the past fifty years have been directly chargeable to the railways; and that a very large proportion, perhaps nearly as much as half, of the litigation that has occupied our courts during the same period has been directly connected with railway matters.," The great panic of 1873 was directly due to the over-building of railroads. Following it came several years of terrible business depression throughout the country, in which time and money was spent in trying to clear away the-wreck. Hundreds of railroad companies were bankrupted and loss and suffering were entailed upon hundreds of thousands of persons who had invested their savings in these enterprises. In no end of instances the stocks of-the companies. were wiped out of existence entirely, the roads--sold under foreclosure and reorganized. Again, in 1877, when the country-was just beginning to recover from the shock, it was disturbed and depressed for a long time by the I trouble between the railroad companies and their Q workmen, which in some...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 138 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 259g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236944771
  • 9781236944771