Our British Ancestors; Who and What Were They? an Inquiry Serving to Elucidate the Traditional History of the Early Britons by Means of Recent Excavations, Etymology, Remnants of Religious Worship, Inscriptions, Craniology, and Volume 1

Our British Ancestors; Who and What Were They? an Inquiry Serving to Elucidate the Traditional History of the Early Britons by Means of Recent Excavations, Etymology, Remnants of Religious Worship, Inscriptions, Craniology, and Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ...Archima-el, Din-el, Penis-el, all of them embrace that sacred name which was the object of their venerationl. The custom of including the name of the deity in the appellations of individuals is thus alluded to in Isaiah xliv. 5: "One shall say, I am the Lord's, and another shall call himself by the name of Jacob, and another shall subscribe with his hand unto the Lord and surname himself by the name of Isra-el: " Israel, i.e. one who has influence with God. So the Phoenicians, Gauls, and other nations had doubtless the object, in assuming the names of their gods, of assuring to themselves their influence, interest, and protection. The names of their divinities entered into their own family names, the names of their dwellings, their rivers, their mountains, and their rocks. The gods had their representatives in the very trees and plants. Not only did Jezebel's name include that of her god Baal or Bel, but she kept a staff of priests who ate at her table. The name of Baal was quite a patronymic in her family. Her father was Eth-baal or Itho-bal, and her Carthaginian relative Hanni-bal and Asdru-bal kept up the unceasing memorial of their chief god. 1 M. Gengbrier in his " History of Carausius" (p. 136) mentions an inscription discovered in England, a votive tablet offered to the peaceful Mars by El-egaurba, evidently a Briton: --PACIPEBO MABTI ELEGAVHBA POSVIT EX VOTO The name of Elegaurba seems to embrace both 7 and-ltN under its British form of Owaur. So did the Britons include the name of Baal in their own names, as Belinusm, Cassi-belaunus--query u b2 DDp, Ceesh-Bal, 'to divine by Baal.' From Ceeth, query, Anglice, 'guess, ' Dutch, ghissen. Cunobelinus seems to be an association of Chiun and Baal. Several inscriptions...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236571576
  • 9781236571571