The Oscan-Umbrian Verb-System

The Oscan-Umbrian Verb-System

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...for departing from it have not impressed me as valid. There is nothing to show that the Lith. a, Lett. 1 in the genitive singular (old ablative) cannot stand for I. E. 5 as well as in Lith. Iz/on! ' hedge, ' Lett. laire to tverizi, Lith. 'i-toka to teb' and hundreds of other noun--and verb---derivatives of the e-series. And I do not agree with Hirt. l.c. that until the conditions for the appearance of I. E. 5 as Lith. o are known, we cannot operate with such a change. One might as well maintain that until the lavs for the appearance of I. E. 5 as Lith. z3 are settled, we cannot operate with this representation. And the Italic forms? Are we to deny utterly the existence of adverbs and particles formed from 5-stems? And if not, if we still regard as such Gr.; .a.xpd.v, o'xe6l17v, Lat. quam, tam, Gr. Dor. xpucents1'i, ravrii, and numerous other formations, why must we view otherwise the Latin form-511? And as al is regarded as loc. of an 5-stem in contrast to cl of an a-stem, why not understand in the same way the difference between Lat. contr5 and O. contrud? The preponderance of the-511 forms in Italic may be due to the fact that in many cases 1/z'5 was understood, e.g. in su/trad, exirad, just as in sexi5, rmi, sinistrri, for which cf. Delbriick, Idg. Syntax, I, p. 565. In favor of the derivation of Lith. gen. sing.-o from-Ed, cf. now also Zubaty, I. F. IV, p. 476. analogy of-to (-tzid), and the-mu itself is probably formed from the suffix-ma-after the analogy of-m, as if this were from the suflix-to. The r of O. censamur is a further modification, after the other passive forms in-r. The Umbrian forms never had this-r. The Conjugations. The general features of the conjugations have already been treated above, p. 131 ff. Ishow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236873718
  • 9781236873712