Origines Kalendariae Hellenicae; Or, the History of the Primitive Calendar Among the Greeks, Before and After the Legislation of Solon Volume 6

Origines Kalendariae Hellenicae; Or, the History of the Primitive Calendar Among the Greeks, Before and After the Legislation of Solon Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1862 edition. Excerpt: ...fact, it is true, either in the Iliad or in the Odyssey; but we may reasonably infer it, both from the distinction of the y.rv Qdivtav, and the jur/v lorafieVos, (and by parity of reason the p)i ntv&v, ) recognised by him, and also from the frequency of the instances, both in the Iliad and in the Odyssey, in which this number of ten days, or some other, which is a multiple of ten, is specified, to define the length of time for which such and such a thing was done or continued to be done. The most probable explanation of this idiom is that the month was ordinarily divided m Cf. Justin Martyr, Cohortatio ad Grsecos, xxix. where this verse stands, 'AAA cUl aUpa Zttpvpiij-wytiovca ra fifv tui &AAa 5e ircVirci. n Odyss. H. 117. o vii. H. in sqq. P Cf. Vol. i. Page 3 n: supra, Page 329. into decads or tens; some one, or some two of which we may presume to have been meant in each of these instances. The examples of the idiom referred to are almost too numerous to be quoted; but the reader would do well to turn to them, and examine them for himself"1. Eustathius observes on one of these passagesr: Oi be /cat apxaiov idos (paai To rfj beK&Tfl epwrcurOai Tovs evovs, b Kal em 'Ae &vbpov yeviadat tpaoiv, ore T3 MereAato eva6eh aQripnacre r?)i 'Eevqv--a practice, if true, founded no doubt on the same division of the equable solar month anciently every wheres. In the story of the entertainment of Silenus by Midas, which Ovid relates in his Metamorphoses, and which he probably derived from Theopompus, attention is paid to this usage of primitive life. Hospitis adventu festum genialiter egit Per bis quinque dies et junctas ordine noctes. Et jam stellarum sublime coegerat agmen Lucifer undecimus, Lydus quum lsetus in agros Rex...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 264 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 476g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236508378
  • 9781236508379