An Original Essay on the Immateriality & Immortality of the Human Soul; Founded Solely on Physical and Rational Principles

An Original Essay on the Immateriality & Immortality of the Human Soul; Founded Solely on Physical and Rational Principles

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ... being, without which, that being cannot subsist. And by annihilation, I mean, not only; the destruction of any and every modification Which _it ' might have assumed, but the utter destruction of all being; and the reduction of any substance to an absa-Y lute nonentily. It', therefore, the soul, which is an im material substance, perish, it must be in one of these three ways. mm sour. CANNOT PERISH BY mssoLUTtoN, PRIYATION, ' on ANNIHILATION. In the soul perishes through dissolution, it must be by having those parts disunited, of which it is composed. But this cannot possibly be; because the soul is not an assemblage of distinct substances, but, as has been already proved, a simple, uncompounded, sub stance; and therefore has no parts to be dissolved.To suppose any substance capable of being dissolved, which has no parts, is a contradiction--it supposes a separation of parts, in a being which has noparts to be separated. A being, which has no parts included in the abstract idea of its existence, can never have any thing taken from it; and where nothing can be taken away, that being must necessarily be incapable of dissolution. An exclusion of all parts, is necessary to the existence of an immaterial substance; and to suppose a being to be dissolved, from the very nature of whose existence:1. capacity of dissolution is necessarily excluded, is a flat contradiction;--it is supposing a being to be capable, and yet incapable of dissolution, at the same time. VVhatever has parts, cannot be immaterial; and what has no parts, can never lose them. To suppose an imrnaterial substance to have parts, destroys its immateriality;for it is a contradiction to suppose that to be immaterial, which by its parts is demonstrated to be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236926927
  • 9781236926920