The Origin of the Suez Canal (Continued). a Question of the Day. After the War of 1870-1871. the Interoceanic Canal and the Congress of 1879. Steam. Algeria and Tunis. Abd-El-Kader. Abyssinia. the Origin and Duties of Consuls. Volume 2

The Origin of the Suez Canal (Continued). a Question of the Day. After the War of 1870-1871. the Interoceanic Canal and the Congress of 1879. Steam. Algeria and Tunis. Abd-El-Kader. Abyssinia. the Origin and Duties of Consuls. Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...as well by her counsels as by the assistance of a great many Frenchmen distinguished in science, in administration, and in all the arts of war and peace, will not, for her part, attempt to realise the projects of another age so long as England does not set foot there. "But should one of those crises which have so often shaken the East occur, or any circumstance arise which should compel England to take up a position in Egypt, in order to prevent any other Power forestalling her, it is certain that the alliance would not survive the complications which such an event would bring about. And why should England consider herself forced to make herself mistress of Egypt, even at the risk of breaking up her alliance with France? For the simple reason that Egypt is England's shortest and most direct route to her Eastern possessions, that this route must be constantly open to her, and that upon this vital point she can admit of no compromise. Thus, by reason of the very position which in nature she occupies, Egypt may again be the subject of a conflict between France and Great Britain, so that this chance of a rupture would disappear if by some providential event the geographical conditions of the Old World were altered, and the route to India, instead of traversing the heart of Egypt, was put back to its limits, and, being open to all the world, could no longer be the privilege of any one nation in particular. "Well, this event, which must be in the designs of Providence, is now within the possibility of human accomplishment. It may be achieved by human enterprise, and may be realised by piercing the Isthmus of Suez--an undertaking to which nature offers no obstacle, and to which the capital of England, as well as of other countries, would...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236494601
  • 9781236494603