Origin and History of All Breeds of Poultry; Trustworthy Information Regarding the Origin and History of All Recognized Varieties of Chickens, Ducks and Geese

Origin and History of All Breeds of Poultry; Trustworthy Information Regarding the Origin and History of All Recognized Varieties of Chickens, Ducks and Geese

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...in 1850; just think of the different breeds that produce them. At the first Boston Poultry Show held at the Public Gardens on Nov. 16, 1849, Red Shanghais and Cochin Chinas, "the cockerels were generally red, ' ' were exhibited, as well as Plymouth Rocks, which, as I said before, produced Red males. At this time, we also find Red Malays and Red Chittagongs. The Shakebag fowl were imported to this country by Mr. J. L. Tucker of the Tremont House, Boston. Mr. Mowbray thus writes of one in his possession, "The only one I ever possessed was a red one in 1784, weighing about ten pounds," and Dickson says "the plumage of the male is brilliant in the extreme, being a bright red--the hens are of a bright yellow." I do not need to quote more to convince you that Red cocks are nothing new, even though the world did loose sight of them, except isolated Little Compton, R. I. It was the ghost of Hamlet 's father who, suddenly hearing the crowing of the cock, announces abruptly, that he "snuffs the morning air," and then vanishes to his dreary home. Probably this very crower was a Red cock. The red rooster of fifty years ago vanished to a small country village, but now has been returned to the large world. If the R. I. Reds were not a worthy breed they would have been relegated from the show room long before this..Little Compton, R. I., and Wertfort, Mass., are adjoining towns, lying to the southward of Fall River, Mass. One small vessel from 1827 to 1850 made about twenty-five trips annually between Westfort and Providence, R. I., averaging 400 dozen of eggs. The total was 3,450,000, and the value of them $35,000. This gives some idea of the value of the ancestors of the Reds in 1850. Finally...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236993373
  • 9781236993373