Ores and Metals Volume 16

Ores and Metals Volume 16

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ... means of escape--in other words with channels! Professor Van Hise calls attentior to the fact that at a certain depth the critical temperature of water (360r C.) would be reached, and that it could not exist as water below that depth But It does not follow that the form in which it could exist would not possess equal density and solvent powei. According to the rate of Increase assumed by many writers--1 C. foi every 30 m. of added depth--the critical temperature would be reached at 10,350 m., if 15 C. be taken as the temperature of the surface. But we are scarcely warranted in assuming that rate as uniform to great depths. M. Walferdin, by a series of careful observations In two sharts at Creuzot. proved that down to a depth of 1.800 feet the Increase in temperature amounted to 1 F. for every fifty-five feet of descent; but below the depth named the rate of Increase was as great as 1" F. for every forty-four reet. On the other hand, in the great boring of Crenelle, at Paris, the increase in temperature down to 740 feet was 1 F. for every flftv feet: but from 740 to 1,600 feet it diminished to 1 F. for every seventy-five feet. A similar remarkable fact was shown in the Sperenberg boring near Berlin, where the rate of increase for 1.900 feet was 1 F. for every fifty-five feet, and for the next 2,000 feet only 1 F. for every sixty-two feet. In the deep well at Buda Pesth there was actually found a decline in temperature below the depth of 3.000 feet. A list of 164 wells, from 400 to 2,220 feet deep, bored in the United States, shows Irregularities of temperature not to be referred to any general formula. To the rule mentioned above--namely. 1 C. for every 30 m. of added depth--there are far more exceptions than confirmations. No doubt...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 576 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 30mm | 1,016g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236740122
  • 9781236740120