The Oregon Farmer; What He Has Accomplished in Every Part of the State; A Preliminary Agricultural Survey Under the Direction of an Advisory Committee from the Faculty of the Oregon Agricultural College

The Oregon Farmer; What He Has Accomplished in Every Part of the State; A Preliminary Agricultural Survey Under the Direction of an Advisory Committee from the Faculty of the Oregon Agricultural College

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...is unusually good. No better crops than clover seed, vetch seed, grass seeds, field pea seed, field beans, alfalfa seed or potatoes can be found either for profits or fertility. THE CLIMATE OF OREGON. Br W. L. Pownas, Assistant Professor of Irrigation and drainage. MONG the factors influencing the agriculture and healthfulness of a state none is more important than climate. The determining factors of a climate in Oregon are chiefly the altitude, nearness to the ocean, prevailing winds, and movements of general storm areas. The wide variations of these conditions in Oregon cause a great diversity of climate and makes possible the production of practically everything grown outside the tropics. General Topographic and Climatic Conditions. The chief topographic features of the state are portrayed by the accompanying rainfall chart of the Weather Bureau, page 64, and the topographic map, which we are permitted to reproduce thru the courtesy of our District Forecaster, E. A. Beals, of Portland (Enclosed). The natural drainage for most parts of the state is northerly into the Columbia or else westward into the ocean. The lofty snowcapped Cascade Range, 5,000 to 10,000 feet in elevation divides the state north and south and serves as a natural barrier in winter between the warm air of the western valleys and the cool air of the plateaus to the east. East of this range the climate is continental in character and is semi-arid with large daily range of temperature, cool nights and a preponderance of clear days. The climate of Western Oregon is characterized by its mild moist winter season and bright mild summers with a remarkably long growing season. The Cascade and Coast Ranges cause heavy precipitation in winter from the moist winds and storm...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123682069X
  • 9781236820693