Orbital Mechanics

Orbital Mechanics

4 (6 ratings by Goodreads)
By (author)  , By (author) 

List price: US$97.95

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

In the planning of any space mission, whether manned or unmanned, one of the most important problems to solve is the orbital mechanics of the spaceflight-how to get the spacecraft from here to there. Sometimes the problem is a relatively simple one: for instance, determining the amount of thrust for how much time to get the space shuttle into a low-earth stable orbit has been more or less perfected. But working out the equations for launching the Voyager probe to visit four major planets, their satellites and rings, without crashing into any of them or flying too far from them, was a formidable problem. As more spaceflights are planned and designed, students and engineers will need improved training in orbital mechanics. This classroom-tested textbook takes its title from an elective course at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign which has been taught to senior undergraduates and first-year graduate students for the past 22 years. The subject of orbital mechanics is developed starting from the first principles of Newton's laws of motion and the law of gravitation. However, unlike other books, the authors also derive the other important results from the first principles, including the fundamental Kepler's equation, the n-body and two-body equations of motion and Kepler's laws of planetary motion, orbital elements, Lambert's time-of-flight equation, the rocket equation and staging, impulsive orbit transfer and rendezvous, interplanetary spacecraft trajectories, the hyperbolic gravity-assist relations, the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations of relative motion, the Lagrange perturbation equations, and the Gauss and Laplace methods of orbit determination. The subjects of orbit transfer and spacecraft trajectories receive special attention because they are a favorite research area of the authors and their students.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 206 pages
  • 152.4 x 233.7 x 22.9mm | 430.92g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • halftone, line figures, tables
  • 0195078349
  • 9780195078343
  • 2,076,494

About John E. Prussing

John A. Prussing and Bruce A. Conway are Professors of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.show more

Back cover copy

One of the major challenges of modern space mission design is the orbital mechanics - determining how to get a spacecraft to its destination using a limited amount of propellant. Recent missions such as Voyager and Galileo required gravity assist maneuvers at several planets to accomplish their objectives. Today's students of aerospace engineering face the challenge of calculating these types of complex spacecraft trajectories. This classroom-tested textbook takes its title from an elective course which has been taught to senior undergraduates and first-year graduate students for the past 22 years. The subject of orbital mechanics is developed starting from the first principles, using Newton's laws of motion and the law of gravitation to prove Kepler's empirical laws of planetary motion. Unlike many texts the authors also use first principles to derive other important results including Kepler's equation, Lambert's time-of-flight equation, the rocket equation, the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations of relative motion, Gauss' equations for the variation of the elements, and the Gauss and Laplace methods of orbit determination. The subject of orbit transfer receives special attention. Optimal orbit transfers such as the Hohmann transfer, minimum-fuel transfers using more than two impulses, and noncoplanar orbital transfer are discussed. Patched-conic interplanetary trajectories including gravity-assist maneuvers are the subject of an entire chapter and are particularly relevant to modern space missions.show more

Table of contents

1. The n-body problem ; 2. Position in orbit as a function of time ; 3. The orbit in space ; 4. Lambert's Problem ; 5. Rocket Dynamics ; 6. Impulsive Orit transfer ; 7. Interplanetary Mission Analysis ; 8. Linear orbit theory ; 9. Determination of the perturbed orbit ; 10. Orbit Determination ; Appendices ; Indexshow more

Review quote

'The book is a paragon of clarity and has problems and worked examples.' New Scientist 'The book is a paragon of clarity and has problems and worked examples.' David Hughes, New Scientist Figures and tables are large and readable. There are three very simple one-page appendixes and a short, four-page index. Good references and problem sets ... are found at the end of each chapter. Choice June 1994show more

Rating details

6 ratings
4 out of 5 stars
5 33% (2)
4 50% (3)
3 0% (0)
2 17% (1)
1 0% (0)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X