An Oration, Delivered by the Honorable William W. Campbell, Judge of the Supreme Court of New York

An Oration, Delivered by the Honorable William W. Campbell, Judge of the Supreme Court of New York : February 23d, 1832, at Metropolitan Hall, New York City, on the Occasion of the Celebration of the Birth Day of George Washington, by Order of United Ameri

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Excerpt from An Oration, Delivered by the Honorable William W. Campbell, Judge of the Supreme Court of New York: February 23d, 1832, at Metropolitan Hall, New York City, on the Occasion of the Celebration of the Birth Day of George Washington, by Order of United Americans I have said the men were trained up for their work. Take our illustrious man as an example. We have seen that at the close of the first French war he was a youthful surveyor amid the wild mountains and primeval forests of Western Virginia. In the second French war he was with General Braddock when he sustained such a signal defeat on the banks of the Monongahela - dc feated because he did not follow the advice of the then youthful soldier. Sub. Sequently Washington was a member of the house of Burgesses of his native state - was elected a member of the first Continental Congress - made Com mander-in-chief - then President of the Convention which gave to us our present Constitution, and then elected to fill the Office of the first President of the United States. In our State, the Schuylers, the Clintons, and other distinguished men, had 'been trained up both in arms in French and Indian wars, and as public men in our Provincial Legislature. The condition of the people at the period of the revolution was eminently favorable to their success. They were neither poor nor rich; they were not driven by want to abject submission, or to extreme radicalism, nor by fear of losing great wealth to ultra conservatism. They owned a fertile soil from which they chiefly drew their subsistence, and they had hardy frames with which to cultivate it. They were enured to labor and accustomed to the use of firms from early youth. Education prevailed among all Classes. The great mass of the people were religiously educated. When they declared that all men were created equal, and endowed with certain unalienable rights, they proclaimed that those rights were given to them by their Creator. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 2mm | 54g
  • Forgotten Books
  • United States
  • English
  • , black & white illustrations
  • 0243263724
  • 9780243263721