Ophthalmoscopic Diagnosis; Based on Typical Pictures of the Fundus of the Eye with Special Reference to the Needs of General Practitioners and Students

Ophthalmoscopic Diagnosis; Based on Typical Pictures of the Fundus of the Eye with Special Reference to the Needs of General Practitioners and Students

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ... The color is commonly a pure white, in which it varies from other forms of sheathing. A third form is shown in Fig. 42. This is the one that is met with in those cases in which an acute sheathing of the retinal vessels appears simultaneously with signs of retinitis; it can be explained only as a filling of the lymph spaces of the adventitia with white blood corpuscles. The bright bands along the upper vessels in Fig. 33 have to be explained in a similar manner, except that here the fluid has already left the sheaths of the vessels. The white deposits of lime, and other concrements, that occur here and there, need only to be mentioned. The complete interruption of a vessel with the signs of a sudden occlusion (see Fig. 45) indicates the presence of an embolus, or a thrombus, within it. Sometimes the accompanying stripes are only simulated by the reflection of light along the vessels. This sort of reflection is seen very often (see page 26), especially in young persons in whom the fundus is dark. They can be recognized from the fact that they change as the mirror is rotated. Such reflections are shown in Figs. 2 and 30. C. Changes in the Number of the Vessels The number of vessels may be diminished or increased. A diminution is met with in marked sclerosis (Fig. 56), as well as in injuries and diseases of the retina, especially those that are associated with a development of connective tissue (Fig. 36). An apparent diminution, due to some being rendered invisible, is to be observed when the optic nerve is suddenly severed through the portion that contains the vessels, when arteries are occluded (Figs. 44 and 45), and when great oedema is present, as well as in cases of tumor and of detachment of the retina. A smaller number of vessels than normal...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236494342
  • 9781236494344