Online Chinese Nationalism and China's Bilateral Relations

Online Chinese Nationalism and China's Bilateral Relations

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Description

Since the Chinese were officially plugged into the virtual community in 1994, the usage of the internet in the country has developed at an incredible rate. By the end of 2008, there were approximately 298 million netizens in China, a number which surpasses that of the U.S. and ranks China the highest user in the world. The rapid development of the online Chinese community has not only boosted the information flow among citizens across the territory, but has also created a new form of social interaction between the state, the media, various professionals and intellectuals, as well as China's ordinary citizens. Although the subject of this book is online Chinese nationalism, which to a certain extent is seen as a pro-regime phenomenon, the emergence of an online civil society in China intrinsically provides some form of supervision of state power-perhaps even a check on it. The fact that the party-state has made use of this social interaction, while at the same time remaining worried about the negative impact of the same netizens, is a fundamental characteristic of the nature of the relationship between the state and the internet community. Many questions arise when considering the internet and Chinese nationalism. Which are the most important internet sites carrying online discussion of nationalism related to the author's particular area of study? What are the differences between online nationalism and the conventional form of nationalism, and why do these differences exist? Has nationalist online expression influenced actual foreign policy making? Has nationalist online expression influenced discourse in the mainstream mass media in China? Have there been any counter reactions towards online nationalism? Where do they come from? Online Chinese Nationalism and China's Bilateral Relations seeks to address these questions.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 310 pages
  • 157.48 x 228.6 x 25.4mm | 544.31g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • 0739132474
  • 9780739132470
  • 1,712,773

Review quote

This pioneering volume illuminates a crucial new frontier in the popular articulation of Chinese nationalism in this age of hi-tech global instant communication via the Internet. Its Sino-external interface case studies vividly amplify the internet as a powerful transformational instrument with profound academic, economic, political, diplomatic and strategic impact. Those keen to learn the fuller dimensions and implications of a rising China as an electronically-connected soft power player with domestic realpolitik consequences will enjoy its rich details and refreshing findings... -- Ming K. CHAN, Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University Simon Shen and Shaun Breslin note how the emergence of an online civil society in China intrinsically provides some form of supervision of state power, and perhaps even a check on it. Brookings, June 2010 This volume is one of the most original and important volumes for years on China's international relations. It looks at the growing phenomenon of the emergence of a quasi-civil society in China via the internet, and uses it as a basis for a rethinking of how China relates to the rest of the world, including the battlegrounds with the Western world for power such as Africa and Latin America. This is truly international relations for the century to come. -- Rana Mitter, University of Oxford This pioneering volume illuminates a crucial new frontier in the popular articulation of Chinese nationalism in this age of hi-tech global instant communication via the Internet. Its Sino-external interface case studies vividly amplify the internet as a powerful transformational instrument with profound academic, economic, political, diplomatic and strategic impact. Those keen to learn the fuller dimensions and implications of a rising China as an electronically-connected soft power player with domestic realpolitik consequences will enjoy its rich details and refreshing findings. -- Ming K. CHAN, Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford Universityshow more

About Simon Shen

Simon Shen is associate professor in the Department of Social Sciences at the Hong Kong Institute of Education and chief coordinator/adjunct associate professor of the Master of Global Political Economy Programme at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Shaun Breslin is professor in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick.show more

Table of contents

Part 1 Introduction Chapter 2 1. When China Plugged In: Structural Origins of Online Chinese Nationalism Chapter 3 2. Nationalism-on-demand? When Chinese Sovereignty Goes Online Part 4 The First Layer: Japan, Taiwan and the USA Chapter 5 3. China's Online Nationalism towards Japan Chapter 6 4.Networking Anti-Japanese Protests: Popular Sovereignty Reasserted since 2005 Chapter 7 5. Alternative Online Chinese Nationalism: Response to the Anti-Japanese Campaign in China on Hong Kong's Internet Chapter 8 6. Ethnocentric Perceptive Re-explored: Online Chinese Nationalism toward Taiwan Chapter 9 7. The "Two Americas" Dichotomy: Online Chinese Nationalism towards the United States of America Part 10 The Second Layer: The Rests of the World Chapter 11 8. Beyond Sino-ASEAN Relations: Online Chinese Nationalism towards Southeast Asia Chapter 12 9. Online Chinese Nationalism toward the European Union: Economic and Diplomatic Implications of the Olympic Torch Relay Protests Chapter 13 10. Online Nationalism and Sino-UK Relations Chapter 14 11. A constructed (un)reality on China's re-entry into Africa: the Chinese online community perception of Africa Chapter 15 12.Discussions on Sino-Latin American Relations at Qiangguo Forums (or the Lack Thereof) Part 16 Conclusion Chapter 17 13. Online Chinese nationalism(s): Comparisons and Findingsshow more