The One Primeval Language Traced Experimentally Through Ancient Inscriptions in Alphabetic Characters of Lost Powers from the Four Continents; Including the Voice of Israel from the Rocks of Sinai and the Vestiges of Patriarchal Volume 1

The One Primeval Language Traced Experimentally Through Ancient Inscriptions in Alphabetic Characters of Lost Powers from the Four Continents; Including the Voice of Israel from the Rocks of Sinai and the Vestiges of Patriarchal Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$14.13

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ... thus, QJ7, or thus, CH; and not unfrequently imperfect, thus Qlf, or thus WP, evidently owing to the writer not being at pains to complete it by the connecting stroke: a carelessness incident not uncommonly to frequency of repetition. This last form j Jr, let me at once into the secret of Professor Beer's discovery; who, mistaking the imperfectly formed character for two letters, assigned to its first limb the power of the Hebrew schin, to the second limb ), that of the Hebrew lamed, and thus ingeniously obtained his own reading of the word in its general, and perfect, biliteral form i, viz. the triliteral tDbttf, Peace. I expressed my surprise at the time to the gentleman who first introduced Beer's treatise to my acquaintance, and informed me of his version of the initial rU; adding that the word would prove to be 6m, not shalum, and the quadruped mentioned by Mr. Gray, to be the figure of a wild ass. Little was I aware that the book which my informant held in his hand, contained a duplicate of the inscription, with the figure of the animal.. Prof. Beer's renderings of the inscriptions might be summarily disposed of by a single consideration. Many of the inscriptions are common-places: the same sentences repeated on different rocks, probably, too, distant from each other. On the Professor's theory, they are all proper names. It follows that his ideal pilgrims, not satisfied with clambering up the rocks, under which they had paused to rest, in order merely to engrave their names, must, in the cases referred to, have toiled from rock to rock, to repeat again and again the toilsome record of their pilgrimage. The author of the inscription illustrated by the wild ass, for example, must have carved, or dotted in, his own name, at least...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236635183
  • 9781236635181