One Hundred Years of Medicine and Surgery in Missouri; Historical and Biographical Review of the Careers of the Physicians and Surgeons of the State of Missouri, and Sketches of Some of Its Notable Medical Institutions

One Hundred Years of Medicine and Surgery in Missouri; Historical and Biographical Review of the Careers of the Physicians and Surgeons of the State of Missouri, and Sketches of Some of Its Notable Medical Institutions

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ... symptoms of cerebrospinal fever. Carefully prepared interrogatories were sent to every physician known to be treating a case, and from these reports an interesting and valuable compilation and summarv was made of the disease as it appeared in St. Louis in the past two years. To-day the Health Department is caring for 650 patients at the City Hospital, 260 at the Female Hospital, 634 insane at the Insane Asylum, 880 insane at the Poorhouse and 718 paupers at the Poorhouse, 11 cases at the Smallpox Hospital, and are daily treating 100 persons ai the dispensaries. The following table is evidence what organized and intelligent, sanitation has assisted in doing for the city of St. Louis: Death rate per 1,000 for fiscal years endingApril, 1850 '. 56.9 April, 1860 31.1 April, 1870 21.4 April, 1880 18.9 April, 1890 18.2 April, 1900 14.7 CHAPTER XIII.--HOSPITALS OF MISSOURI. There are more hospitals in Missouri than in Africa and more hospital beds in the Valley of the Mississippi than in all Asia. A hundred years ago the hospital in the minds of the people was a synonym for suffering, for experiment and extreme necessity. To go to the hospital was equivalent to going through the valley and shadow of death. After the Civil War the hospital idea grew rapidly. "With the advent of antiseptics came the certainty of better surgical results, and it was soon demonstrated that the best antiseptic precautions could only be obtained in properly constituted hospitals. In medicine, too, it was found that certain diseases, such as fevers and various forms of nervous conditions, could be better cared for in a sanitarium. Soon the hospital was seen, not only in the larger cities, but in smaller towns and valleys. It took bold of public affection and confidence, as...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544447
  • 9781236544445