On the Power, Wisdom and Goodness of God; As Manifested in the Adaptation of External Nature to the Moral and Intellectual Constitution of Man Volume 2

On the Power, Wisdom and Goodness of God; As Manifested in the Adaptation of External Nature to the Moral and Intellectual Constitution of Man Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...of the premises--both the major and the minor propositions being generally verified in this way; while the connection between these and the conclusion, is all, in the syllogism, wherewith the art of logic has properly to do. In none of the sciences, is the logic of itself available for the purposes of discovery; and it can only contribute to this object, when furnished with sound data, the accuracy of which is determined by observation alone. This holds particularly true of the mixed mathematics, where the conclusions are sound, only in as far as the first premises are sound See this distinction admirably expounded in Whately's Logic--a work of profound judgment, and which effectually vindicates the honours of a science, that, since the days of Bacon, or rather (which is more recent) since the days of his extravagant because exclusive authority, it has been too much the fashion to depreciate. The author, if I might use the expression without irreverence, has given to Bacon the things which are Bacon's, and to Aristotle the things which are Aristotle's. He has strengthened the pretensions of logic by narrowing them--that is, instead of placing all the intellectual processes under its direction, by assigning to it as its proper subject the art of deduction alone. He has made most correct distinction between the inductive and the logical; and it is by attending to the respective provinces of each, that we come to perceive the incompetency of mere logic for the purpose of discovery strictly so called. The whole chapter on discovery is particularly valuable--leading us clearly to discriminate between that which logic can, and that which it cannot achieve. It is an instrument, not for the discovery of truths properly new, but for the discovery...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236803558
  • 9781236803559