On the Mollusca of East-Greenland; I. Lamellibranchiata. with and Introduction on Greenland's Fossil Mollusc-Fauna from the Quaternary Time

On the Mollusca of East-Greenland; I. Lamellibranchiata. with and Introduction on Greenland's Fossil Mollusc-Fauna from the Quaternary Time

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...and does not pass the lenght of 5 cm. I have moreover seen it in abundance in Tunok, in the littoral belt in less numbers, but the specimens were large, of a length of 6-48 cm. it is rather common at-the bird-islands in lkerasak, Kangarsik, Kingak Angmagsivik (66 N.), lngmikertok, lngmikertorajik, lkerasausak, Kuarmiut, Tiningnekelak, Norait and Anova. in most of these localities only a few specimens of a length not exceeding 5 cm. occurred, besides young ones; but in one single place my native companion found at low water ca. 6 pints of very large specimens (8 cm.). According to the Rev. Ryttel's statement it is very common in lkerasausak along the whole coast of the sound. At all the natives' dwellings, houses as well as tent-places, we find in the kitchenmiddens considerable heaps of shells which almost entirely consist of Mytitil The specimens are most frequently exquisitely large, but now and then we also find heaps of smaller specimens till quite young ones. The natives highly appreciate the mussel, they neglect no opportunity to eat it in numbers, where they find it on their summer journeys, they will even postpone their journeys for days in order to use the low water time to empty some rocks. Studier over nordiske Mollusker, ll; Vidensk. Medd. Naturh. Foren. Kbhvn. 1902 (p. 40-41). Comp. also N. Knipowitsch, Ann. Musee Zool. de l'Acad. Imp. des Sci. St. Petersbourg, T. VIII, 1903, p. 133; and the present treatise p. 300--303. It is always eaten au nature and the natives do not care for it when it has been cooked. As food it is yet of the greatest importance in spring when the supply of seal-meat has been used up. Then it is gathered with the hand through the holes and cracks in the ice, which always are formed...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236908627
  • 9781236908629