On the Mechanical Equivalent of Heat; With Subsidiary Researches on the Variation of the Mercurial from the Air Thermometer, and on the Variation of the Specific Heat of Water

On the Mechanical Equivalent of Heat; With Subsidiary Researches on the Variation of the Mercurial from the Air Thermometer, and on the Variation of the Specific Heat of Water

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ... c in the formulas. Lay off If equal to c, and draw the line fhk through the point h, which indicates the temperature of the atmosphere or of the vessel surrounding the calorimeter. Draw a vertical line, j k, through the point k. From the point of maximum, c, draw a line, jc, parallel to dm, and where it meets tj will be the required point, and will give the value of 0." Hence, the rise of temperature, corrected for all errors, will be kj. This method, of course, only applies to cases where the final temperatuve of the calorimeter is greater than that of the air; otherwise there will be no maximum. In practice, the line dm is not straight, but becomes more and more nearly parallel to the base line. This is partly due to the constant decrease of the difference of temperature between the calorimeter and the air, but is too great for that to account for it. I have traced it to the thin metal jacket surrounding the calorimeter, and I must condemn, in the strongest possible manner, all such arrangements of calorimeters as have such a thin metal jacket around them. The jacket is of an uncertain temperature, between that of the calorimeter and the air. When the calorimeter changes in temperature, the jacket follows it, but only after some time; hence, the heat lost in radiation is uncertain. The true method is to have a water jacket of constant temperature, and then the rate of decrease of temperature will be nearly constant for a long time. The following results have been obtained by Mr. Jacques, Fellow of the University, though the first was obtained by myself. Corrections were, of course, made for the amount of thermometer stem in the air. To reduce these to the mean temperature of 0 to 40, I have used the rate of increase found by Bede...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236570499
  • 9781236570499