On the Improvement of Society by the Diffusion of Knowledge. the Philosophy of a Future State. the Philosophy of Religion. on the Mental Illumination and Moral Improvement of Mankind. an Essay on the Sin and Evils of Covetousness

On the Improvement of Society by the Diffusion of Knowledge. the Philosophy of a Future State. the Philosophy of Religion. on the Mental Illumination and Moral Improvement of Mankind. an Essay on the Sin and Evils of Covetousness

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...dark and gloomy, they arc no leas real than among the hordes of Africa and Tartary, and the other abodes of savage life. To illustrate this position is the object of the following sketches; in which I shall chiefly refer to the state of society among the nations of Europe, and the United Stales of America, and particularly to the moral character and aspect of the British empire. I shall, in the first place, consider the operation of the malevolent principle as it appears in the actions and dispositions of the young, and in the modes of tuition by which they are trained. In many thousands of instances, it may be observed, that, even before a child has been weaned from its mother's breasts, malignant dispositions are not only fostered, but are regularly taught both by precept and example. Does a child happen to hit its head accidentally against.the corner of a table--it is taught by its nurse, and even by its mother, to avenge the injury on the inanimate object which caused it, and to exhibit its prowess and its revenge Dy beating the table with all its might. Does it cry, through peevishness or pain--it is immediately threatened with being thrown into the ditch, tossed out ol the window, or committed to the charge of some frightful spectre. Is it expedient to repress its murmurings, and to cajole it into obedience--it is then inspired with fallacious hopes, and allured with deceitful promises of objects and of pleasures which are never intended to be realized. Does it require to have its physical powers exercised--a wooden sword or a whip is put into its hands; and it is encouraged to display its energies in inflicting strokes on a dog, a cat, or any of its play-fellow or companions. I have seen a little urchin of U.;a description, three or four...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 686 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 35mm | 1,207g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236629620
  • 9781236629623