On the History and Art of Warming and Ventilating Rooms and Buildings; By Open Fire, Hypocausts, German, Dutch, Russian, and Swedish Stoves, Hot Water

On the History and Art of Warming and Ventilating Rooms and Buildings; By Open Fire, Hypocausts, German, Dutch, Russian, and Swedish Stoves, Hot Water

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...labours on this point, or perhaps in pursuit of distinction, ventured, as was his wonted manner, to give a rule of his own " to determine the position of the covings, so that they shall be best adapted for reflecting the heat of the flame into the room." " Make," he continues, " b, the middle of the front of the grate, and b, c, half the width, which is convenient for the opening; and make, a, b, perpendicular, and equal to, b; then join, a, c, and it is the direction in which the coving should be placed: a greater obliquity would be still more effective, because it would spread the rays more into the room, but is not so convenient in other respects. The back of the fire is usually straight, but unless the fire be small, it is an advantage to make the back in two parts, forming an obtuse angle at e; in this angle the smoke collects and ascends with less obstruction, than when it is dispersed over a flat surface." The reflecting back being placed at 3 inches from the back of the fire-chamber, is very effectual in admitting air to cool the column of smoke after it rises from the fire, and thus enabling it to be blown into the room by eddies, which is further aided by the angle for the smoke much enlarging the depth of the throat of the chimney; the broken back must reflect less of the heat of the flame into the room, than if it were formed straight according to the Count's instructions. On the whole the rule is a good one for spoiling a fireplace. From a notion that the larger the surface of fuel exposed to the room a greater quantity of heat will be emitted, the space between the front bars is always made as wide as possible, and the bars as small; and the practice would be judicious, if the large exposed surface...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236616162
  • 9781236616166