On Early English Pronunciation, with Especial Reference to Shakspere and Chaucer; Containing an Investigation of the Correspondence of Writing with Speech in England from the Anglosaxon Period to the Present Day, Preceded by a Volume 1

On Early English Pronunciation, with Especial Reference to Shakspere and Chaucer; Containing an Investigation of the Correspondence of Writing with Speech in England from the Anglosaxon Period to the Present Day, Preceded by a Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ... qu, which is the form adopted in English. It is needless to say that no orthoepist has distinguished (kw, kw). Gu properly bears the same relation to g as qu to k, but as the form of the 9 remained unchanged, little attention was paid to it. It does not exist as part of the Saxon element of our language. Initially it is generally used superfiuously for g. Occasionally it has the sound (gw) as in language, itself a modern form, anguish, oliTstz'uguz'sh, &c. Usage, however, varies, some saying (la: q'gui_r/dzh, eeq'gwz'sh) and others (lacq'wydzh, aeq'w1'sh). The Italian guale, guauto are apparently (kwuaa'le, gwuan'to). The final-gue for-g as in tongue, plague is quite a modernism. Ague, also spelled agwe in the Promptorium, was probably (aa'gyy) or (aa'guu) from aigue, and hence does not belong to this category. As we have (kj gj, kw gw), so also to our unacknowledged (tj correspond an equally unacknowledged (tw dw, ) which, written tw olw as in between, twain, twang, twist, twelve, twirl; olwinzlle, dwell, dwarf, have been generally considered as (tw, dw), but many of those who have thought on phonetics have been more perplexed to decide whether w was here really a vowel (u) or a consonant (W), than in the corresponding words wean, wain, wist, well, war. The difliculty is resolved by observing that the opening of the lips is really simultaneous with the release of the (t, d) contact. The termination-age is represented as having the sound (-aidzh) in Salesbury, in damage, heritage, language, all French words, and this agrees with Palsgrave, supra, p. 120, note. Smith, Bullokar, Gill, and Butler, however, do not recognize this tendency in English, although Butler notes the similar change of (a) to (ai) before-nge...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 178 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236747356
  • 9781236747358