On Early English Pronunciation, with Especial Reference to Shakespeare and Chaucer; Containing an Investigation of the Correspondence of Writing with Speech in England from the Anglosaxon Period to the Present Day, Volume 14; No. 23

On Early English Pronunciation, with Especial Reference to Shakespeare and Chaucer; Containing an Investigation of the Correspondence of Writing with Speech in England from the Anglosaxon Period to the Present Day, Volume 14; No. 23

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...and many of its sounds are so singular, ---living remnants of habits whichiseem to have been widely diffused in the xth century, but which have become lost, and generally misunderstood in modern times--that a careful examination and explanation of their nature is necessary. As no treatise has as yet appeared which conveys satisfactory information, I have availed myself of the kindness of Mr. Eirikr Magnfisson, ' who, to a perfect knowledge of his native tongue joins a long and familiar acquaintance with the language and pronunciation of England, and who has taken the greatest pains to enable me to render the following account as complete and trustworthy as possible.' Whether the actual pronunciation of Icelandic is or is not the same as that in use in the x th century, it is not easy to determine. The antecedent probability and Norway; then arose the name islena/ta (iis'lenska) which the tongue has kept to the present day."---Rask, Gram. art. 518. "From the North the same tongue was s read over the Ferro, Orkney, Shetland? and Western Isles, and from Iceland to the coast of Greenland: but the old Greenland has been now for a long time lost, and since the Scottish Isles were joined to Scotland, the Old Norse language has given way to the New English. On the Ferro Isles a dialect is still spoken, which comes very near to the Icelandic, but is of little interest since it has no literature except some popular songs."--Ibid. Art. 520. These songs were published with a Danish translation by Lyngbye, Renders, 1822 (Dasent's note). See also Ivar Aasen's Dictionary of the Dialects of N orway. 1 Prof. Th. Mo'bius's Ana ecta Norrena, and Altnordisches Glossar, recently ublished, will be found useful for...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236740009
  • 9781236740007