On the Concentration of the Material, the Manual and Physical Force, in Her Majesty's Vessels of War, and on the Most Effective Method of Manning the Royal Navy

On the Concentration of the Material, the Manual and Physical Force, in Her Majesty's Vessels of War, and on the Most Effective Method of Manning the Royal Navy

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...bears us out in our assertions: --" I have but to refer (says Captain Burton, ) to the indisputable fact, that in addition to some large ships of different rates in each class, there are also building, according to the models at Somerset House, one of 78 and two of 70 guns, line of battle ships; not one frigate of 60 guns, but one of 50; six of 36; and seven donkey frigates of 26 guns; two corvettes of 20 guns; eight brigs of J 6 guns, and eight of 10 guns each--a good display of hoc genus. We have also a number of similar small line-of-battle ships, frigates, and brigs in commission. " When I allude to the powerful ships of France, let it not escape your recollection that there is not only the possibility, but the probability of America availing herself of the difficulties with which we may be embroiled, to settle the complicated boundary question, by cutting that Gordian knot through the medium of war. " To such ships as the Trafalgar, the Queen, or the Rodney, no one can have any objection. My plan is to keep to a similar classification, and thereby not only concentrate force, but save to an incalculable extent in materia. But when to these you add such ships as the Boscawen and Cumberland, and those of their class, of 70 guns, I still maintain that it is neither wise nor prudent to send such ships into action alongside two-decked American or French ships, carrying 100 guns. Moreover, it must be apparent to the least observant, that the material of the 70-gun ships is totally unfit for those of 92 guns, such as the Rodney, and those of her class." One might reasonably have expected that persons convicted of so barefaced a dereliction of truth, would have exhibited some sign of compunction. Nothing of the sort. They dare not, to be sure, repeat...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123665966X
  • 9781236659668