On the Beauties, Harmonies and Sublimities of Nature, 3; With Notes, Commentaries and Illustrations and Occasional Remarks on the Laws, Customs, Habit

On the Beauties, Harmonies and Sublimities of Nature, 3; With Notes, Commentaries and Illustrations and Occasional Remarks on the Laws, Customs, Habit

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1837 edition. Excerpt: ...which mark the two hemispheres, are flat; and the sea more inclined to shallowness than depth. Volcanic matter has been found on the shores of Behring's Straits: and it has, therefore, been reasonably conjectured, that the two continents may have been formerly connected. Earthquakes are frequent in Kamschatka; and some vast visitation of that nature may have rent asunder the isthmus that united them. That the sea once covered the earth is clearly established by bones of animals, petrified fishes, strata of shells, and beds of vegetables, under those marine substances, having been found in many countries, in situations much higher than the sea; and not unfrequently on the sides and even summits of mountains. Some mountains in Chili '' are formed entirely of shells; few of which are in a state of decomposition: and on the Descaheydo, one of the Andes, not much inferior to Chimborazo, are oysters and periwinkles, calcined and petrified. Bivalve shells have been also found on Mount St. Julian in Valencia, enclosed in beds of gypsum, surrounded by detached pieces of slate: and petrified sea substances in a mine of " Letter to Barrow, Nov. 5, 1817. 5 Molina, i. 52. Ulloa, Molina, i. 50. native mercury in a steep hill near San Felippe: And in a white crag of marble on Mount Olympus" have been observed petrified fishes, three hands long, and three fingers broad, with gills clearly discernible. Though shells have been in all ages observed to be component parts of mountains, Bernard Palassy was the first, who asserted them to be real shells; and that they had once been inhabited by fishes: --and he defied the schools of Paris and all the arguments of the followers of Aristotle to prove the contrary. These beds of shells...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 144 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 268g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236877071
  • 9781236877079