On the Beauties, Harmonies, and Sublimities of Nature, 1; With Occasional Remarks on the Laws, Customs, Manners, and Opinions of Various Nations

On the Beauties, Harmonies, and Sublimities of Nature, 1; With Occasional Remarks on the Laws, Customs, Manners, and Opinions of Various Nations

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ...of man, they would fly from a citizen first, and from a mountaineer last." 1 Sketches, b. ii. sk. i. p. 192. Travels in the Crimea, by the Secretary of the Russian Embassy, from Petersburg to Constantinople.. ' At Ahmed Abad Thevenot, part iii. p. 31. 4 St. Ambrose observes, more truly than prudently, --" Natura omnia omnibus in commune profudit; sic enim Deus generart jussit omnia, ut pastus In the present day, this luxury of tranquil life has faded before the increase of population, and the advancement of commercial relations: and such are the distresses of the times, that almost the only species of hospitality, an Englishman can afford, is a tear for want, and sympathy for misfortune. "No radiant pearl, which crested fortune wean, No gem, that twinkling hangs from beauty's ears; Not the bright stars, which night's blue arch adorn; Nor rising suns, that gild the rising morn; Shines with such lustre as theJear, that flows Down Virtue's manly cheek for others' woes." Darwin, canto iii. 459. omnibus communis esset, et terra foret omnium qusedam communis possessio. Natura igitur jus communt generavit; usurpatio jus fecit privatum."--Amb. Offic. 28. 1 Sketches, vol. i. p. 383. Spirit of Laws, b. v. c. 5. CHAPTER IX. Herodotus visited Egypt and Babylon, not only to obtain materials for his history, but to observe the face of the country, as well as the manners of the people. His mind was well stored before he set out. "A traveller," says Sadi, "without previous knowledge, is like a bird without wings." But in every country man is more studied than Nature. Plato and Strabo travelled with enlarged views: and hence the latter derived advantages for a geographical work, not to be paralleled for faithfulness of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 102 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123658502X
  • 9781236585028