Old English Glasses; An Account of Glass Drinking Vessels in England, from Early Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century. with Introductory Notices, Original Documents, Etc

Old English Glasses; An Account of Glass Drinking Vessels in England, from Early Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century. with Introductory Notices, Original Documents, Etc

By (author) 

List price: US$38.24

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ... and twelve "glasses in a neast verj well fitted" had their types in nests of silver bowls of earlier days,1 and their prototypes in the Roman covered bronze boxes of weights (Plate 31). Covered cups, chalice-fashion, for use indifferently for beer or wine are also shown, and "beakers" and "flouer pott glasses " drawn, and ordered Ioth February 1670.2 There remain to be noticed the "clouded Calsedonia," the "speckled enameld," and the " milke whit" cruets with and without feet, and the single, the ribbed, and the gimmal flasks (Plate 32). With respect to the more ornamental of the above-mentioned objects it may be readily gathered that however much Greene insisted that his designs for the usual glasses suited to the English taste should be carried out--he gave no orders without sending a " form " marked with the quantity he wanted--he adopted the better plan respecting the decorative details of handles, ears, etc., of other vessels, of only rudely suggesting what was beyond his power to draw, and adding by letter that they were to be "of good hansom fashions.' The ornamentally pinched, denticulated, and other artistic work was therefore a free rendering of Greene's pen-and-ink crudities by long descended artists practising the traditional methods of work in the manner for which their material was best suited. Evidence of this will be shown presently. Considering the large number of glasses made in Venice to the orders of Greene and other glass-sellers, and the solid character of the greater part of them, it is somewhat surprising how few have survived to the present day; but two centuries and a quarter is a long period for the duration of glass...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 472g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 123686252X
  • 9781236862525
  • 2,295,318