Official Report of the Debates and Proceedings in the State Convention; Assembled May 4th, 1853, to Revise and Amend the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Volume 1

Official Report of the Debates and Proceedings in the State Convention; Assembled May 4th, 1853, to Revise and Amend the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...we, or shall we not abolish it; not upon the assumption that gentlemen who have been members of that Council have not performed their duties honorably and faithfully in comiection with it. By no means. As chairman of the Committee, I surely did not intend any reflection upon myself, having once been a member of that body; and if not upon myself, certainly not upon othms. Then it is solely a question of expediency, and that expediency resolves itself into the simple proposition, can you not do as well without the Council by devolving its duties upon some other Board, as you can with it? And thus simplify your government and reduce its expenses. 'heu I say that you can, and that you can thus simplify the government, I do not meiui what I understand the gentleman from Salem, (Mr. Valcott, ) to intimate, that that is a proposition towards despotism; or, as the gentleman for Abington, (Mr. Keycs, ) supposes, a proposition towards the one man power; a power which he himself exercises more than any man in this Convention, because, as he himself says, he never nets with anybody else; and therefore his power here is peculiarly the one man power. I do not regard it in that light, but rather as a proposition to simplify the government, by bringing the rulers as near to the people as can be done in a way not incompatible with the administration of the government, and diminish the number of oflicers. W'hat said the Declaration of Independence? That under pretence of sending over otfieers to govern us, the King of Great Britain had " sent hither swarms of oflicers to harrass our people and eat our their substance; " and yet you say, increase the number of oilices. I say not. Ilene are nine oflicers, and we purpose to substitute for them five...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 840 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 42mm | 1,470g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236943945
  • 9781236943941