Off the Grid

Off the Grid

4.12 (106 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

From #1 Best-selling author, Ruth Hartzler. Off the Grid (Amish Safe House, Book ONE) Kate Briggs is a U.S. Marshal who works in WITSEC, the federal witness protection program. After an attempt on her life, her boss sends her to live in a small Amish community until the mole in the agency is found. Will Kate, who is used to the ways of the world, be convincing as a sweet Amish woman? When a murder is committed in the community, how will Kate assist the handsome police officer heading up the case without revealing her true identity? And will Kate be able to leave behind her English ways as she finds herself off the grid in more ways than one? In this 3 book series: 1) Off the Grid 2) In Plain View 3) Safe Heartsshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 256 pages
  • 127 x 203.2 x 14.73mm | 344.73g
  • Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1507691181
  • 9781507691182

About Ruth Hartzler

Ruth Hartzler's father was from generations of what people refer to as -Closed Open- or -Gospel Hall- Brethren. Ruth's mother, a Southern Baptist, had years of struggle adapting to the cultural differences, and always cut her hair, which was a continual concern to Ruth's father's family. Ruth was raised strictly Brethren and from birth attended three meetings every Sunday at the Gospel Hall, the Wednesday night meeting, and the yearly -Conference,- until she left the Brethren at the age of twenty one. Ruth still has close friends in the Brethren, as well as the Amish, both groups descending from Anabaptists. Ruth's family had electricity, but not television, radio, or magazines, and they had plain cars. Make up, bright or fashionable clothes, and hair cutting were not permitted for women. Women had to wear hats in meetings (what others would call church meetings) but not elsewhere. The word -church- was never used and there were no bishops or ministers. All baptized men were able to speak (preach, or give out a hymn) spontaneously at meetings. Musical instruments were forbidden, with the exception of the traditional pump organ which was allowed only if played in the home for hymn music. Even so, singing of hymns in accompaniment was forbidden. Ruth Hartzler is a widow with one adult child and two grandchildren. She lives alone with her Yorkshire Terrier and two cats. She is a retired middle school teacher and enjoys quilting, reading, and writing.show more

Rating details

106 ratings
4.12 out of 5 stars
5 49% (52)
4 23% (24)
3 22% (23)
2 5% (5)
1 2% (2)
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