The Ocean; Its Tides and Currents and Their Causes

The Ocean; Its Tides and Currents and Their Causes

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1873 edition. Excerpt: ...of the surface on which they rest, therefore, unless the velocity of the motion of the ocean and the air be greater than that of the surface on which they rest, they must lag behind, forming currents westwards; therefore, if in the motion of axial rotation, the air has the same velocity that the earth's surface moves with, it must then have a relative motion westwards over the surface of the earth. 1 Idem--Article, Wind. And, as far as the orbital motion of the earth is concerned, that which is offered as an objection is not logically an objection at all; because, since in the orbital motion of the earth all particles of the solid surface of the earth move in equal ellipses with equal velocities, therefore, the atmosphere, without changing the relative positions of its particles as regards each other, might, by its particles moving in concentric ellipses, keep pace with the earth, and at the same time have a relative motion over the surface of the earth in lines parallel with the plane of the ecliptic; and at a velocity amounting in the plane of the ecliptic to more than sixty miles a day. It thus appears that, if taken literally, that which has been offered as an objection to the possibility of any current-creating action resulting from the motions of the earth--does, in fact, necessitate a currentcreating action in the plane of the equator as far as the axial rotation of the earth is concerned: and that it admits of a current-creating action in the plane of the ecliptic, as far as the orbital motion of the earth is concerned, at a velocity of more than sixty miles a day. I do not, however, by any means suppose that I have replied completely to the sense in which tlie objection is intended to be understood. The objection appears to be twofold....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123649511X
  • 9781236495112
  • 1,523,646