Occupational Diseases; A Preliminary Report on Lead Poisoning in the City of New York, with an Appendix on Arsenical Poisoning

Occupational Diseases; A Preliminary Report on Lead Poisoning in the City of New York, with an Appendix on Arsenical Poisoning

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ... night shift is 13 hours, making 78 in the week. On the day shift the pay comes out to $12 a week; at night to $19.60. One hour is given, C--says, for dinner. He has lost no time through slack work, but the above-mentioned eight weeks through illness. O----is single. Instructions were given him, he says, when he went into the lead works. He was told to wash carefully, keep out of the dust all he could, and keep his finger nails clean. There were no warnings posted in the plant, according to him. In the morning he usually had no appetite and made a meagre breakfast on a cup or two of coffee. He doesn't smoke or chew, but takes three or four glasses of beer every day; rarely a glass of whiskey. He is in the habit of eating in the work-room, first washing his hands in cold water. He changes all his outer clothing in the shop. He recommends hot and cold water in the factory, wash, rooms, lockers, and a doctor; beyond these he has no suggestions for protective measures. K--has been in this country five years and practically all this time has been employed as a furnace man at the lead oxide works. In that time he has had no less than ten attacks of lead poisoning, the first one in 1908, two years after taking up the work, and the last only a week or two ago, in December, 1911. This last attack kept him seven days from work; the others kept him out from two days to two weeks. K--is a Lithuanian Catholic, born in 1885. From 1899 until 1906 he worked on his father's land, tending the crops and taking care of the livestock. In November of 1906 he thought to better his fortunes and set sail for America. The first job he took was that of furnace man, raking hot pigs of lead over and over until they were properly oxidized for lead litharge...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123682833X
  • 9781236828330