The Obstetrician's Vademecum; Or, Aphorisms on Natural and Difficult Parturition. the Application and Use of Instruments in Preternatural Labours on Labours Complicated with Hemorrhage, Convulsions, Etc

The Obstetrician's Vademecum; Or, Aphorisms on Natural and Difficult Parturition. the Application and Use of Instruments in Preternatural Labours on Labours Complicated with Hemorrhage, Convulsions, Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...wrist, in former times, to assist in bringing down the infant. They are scarcely ever used at present. Some modern practitioners advise a silk handkerchief to be passed over and round each thigh in breech cases, to expedite labour. This proceeding will be unnecessary if the obstetrician turns one hip of the infant to the pubes of the mother at the outlet. (See p. 16.) Symphyseotomy. Sigaultian operation.--When the pelvis is deformed, some foreign obstetricians cut through the symphysis pubis with a scalpel or saw, to enlarge the cavity of the pelvis. The sacro-iliac joints are distended, or sometimes lacerated, by the expansion of the pelvis, after symphyseotomy: the woman may die of inflammation, or be lame for life, after this operation. It is not performed in this country: craniotomy is preferred. Cesarean section. Gastro-hysterotomy. Hyerotomokie.--This operation consists in making an incision along the linea alba through the abdomen and uterus, to extract an infant. Hence it is termed gastro-hysterotomy. There is a modification of the operation, which consists in making an incision through the vagina and uterus, and this is denominated vaginal hysterotomy. Gastro-hysterotomy is never performed in the British dominions unless when the pelvis is so contracted that it is impossible to extract an infant through it by craniotomy. It is performed on the continent of Europe and in America, to save the life of the infant, and in cases in which craniotomy would be performed in this country. In extreme cases of pelvic deformity, craniotomy is considered to be as dangerous to the woman as gastro-hysterotomy. There is a full history of this operation in my "Manual of Obstetricy," which would occupy too much space in a work of this extent....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544536
  • 9781236544537