Observations on the Rate of Mortality & Sickness; Existing Amongst Friendly Societies, Particularised for Various Trades, Occupations, and Localities, with a Series of Tables, Shewing the Value of Annuities, Sick Gift, Assurance for

Observations on the Rate of Mortality & Sickness; Existing Amongst Friendly Societies, Particularised for Various Trades, Occupations, and Localities, with a Series of Tables, Shewing the Value of Annuities, Sick Gift, Assurance for

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...and continues to age 48. At this age one person dies out of every 38.40 persons living. The last increase now takes place, and on arriving at age 52 one person dies out of every 53.73. From this latter age it decreases until the last age in the table. The specific intensity remains below that of the general class up to age 52. At that period it becomes greater than in the general class, and retains its superiority up to 55. After this a lower rate is exhibited at every age. This class of lives shows an inferior expectation at every decennial period of life, the difference being greatest at age 20, viz., 2.79 years, and least at age 60, viz., .62 years. At each decennial period of life the difference decreases. The expectation of life for plumbers, glaziers, and painters, from Mr. Neison's " Vital Statistics," is given at page 42, and also the expectation of this class of lives. From Mr. Neison's experience, on reference thereto, it will be seen that a superior expectation is apparent at each period given. At age 20 the superiority of expectation is by Mr. Neison 1.23, 30 1.09 40 0.37 50 1.15 60, . 0.51 Showing the least variation in the expectation at age 40, and the next least difference at age 60; the greatest difference appears at the earliest period; with a very superior expectation, this class of lives experience far more aggregate sickness than the general class. This class experiences more average sickness at the first period, age 20; at the third age, 40, and at the fourth age, 50, than the general class of lives. At the other periods of life, ages 30 and 60, a less amount is experienced. For the period 20-30 they...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236647793
  • 9781236647795