Observations on Popular Antiquities; Chiefly Illustrating the Origin of Our Vulgar Customs, Ceremonies, and Supersititions Volume 2

Observations on Popular Antiquities; Chiefly Illustrating the Origin of Our Vulgar Customs, Ceremonies, and Supersititions Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$26.71

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841 edition. Excerpt: ...minibus erectis supinisque excipere, occludere oculos, ora obturare, decenter ornare, lavare accurate, et liuteo funebri involvere," &c. Durand. de Ritibus, p. 224. We have the very coffin of the present age described in Durand. "Corpus lotum et sindone obvolutum, ac Loculo conditum, Veteres in ccenaculis, seu Tricliniis exponebant." p. 225. Loculus is a box or chest. Thus in old registers I find coffins called kists, i. e. chests. See Mr. Gough's Sepulchr. Monuments, vol. ii. Introd. p. 5. (8) " The custome is to spread abroad White linens, grac'd with splendour pure." Beaumont's Translation. (7) Misson, speaking of funerals in England, says: "There is an Act of Parliament which ordains that the dead shall be buried in a woollen stuff, which is a kind of a thin bays, which they call flannel; nor is it lawful to use the least needleful of thread or silk. (The intention of this act is for the encouragement of the woollen manufacture.) This shift is always white; but there are different sorts of it as to fineness, and consequently of different prices. To make these dresses is a particular trade, and there are many that sell nothing else." The shirt for a man "has commonly a sleeve purfled about the wrists, and the slit of the shirt down the breast done in the same manner. This should be at least half a foot longer than the body, that the feet of the deceased may be wrapped in it, as in a bag. Upon the head they put a cap, which they fasten with a very broad chin-cloth; with gloves on the hands, and a cravat round the neck, all of woollen. The women have a kind of head-dress with a fore-head cloth." Travels in Engl, translated by Ozell, p. 88. He adds, p. 90, "that the body may ly the softer, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 182 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 336g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236495314
  • 9781236495310