Observations on Man, His Frame, His Duty, and His Expectations; In Two Parts, to Which Ae Now First Added, Paryers and Religious Meditations, by David Hartley. to the First Part Are Prefixed a Sketch of the Life and Volume N . 1

Observations on Man, His Frame, His Duty, and His Expectations; In Two Parts, to Which Ae Now First Added, Paryers and Religious Meditations, by David Hartley. to the First Part Are Prefixed a Sketch of the Life and Volume N . 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1810 edition. Excerpt: ... Eighthly, Sudden and violent pains, such as those from wound, increase the motions of the heart. This may be accounted for from the violent vibrations which ascend to the brain, and are thence propagated to the heart. But may not vibrations ascend also directly from the wounded part, along the course of the arteries and veins, to the heart? Ninthly, All the passions of the mind increase the motion of the heart, as might be expected: but melancholy, when it makes men inactive, and uninfluenced by the impressions of objects, has a contrary effect, which is equally suitable to the foregoing theory. Tenthly, In mortifications, also in the languid state that succeeds acute distempers, &c. the pulse sometimes intermits, suppose once in 5, ic, 20, &c. times, the interval being about double, and the strength of the pulse which succeeds the intermissionabout double also. Here the force of the heart seems to lauguifh, and the time of contraction of the ventricle to be protracted, till a second contraction of the auricle intervenes, and protracts the ventricle's contraction still farther, viz. to nearly twice the interval. The heart must therefore be surcharged, and contracting stronger from this respite, must send, as it were, a double quantity of blood into the aorta, /'. e. make the pulse that succeeds much stronger. And this intermission may return at greater or Jess intervals, according to the circumstances, while this weakness of the heart continues: it may also remain, when once established, from habit, or association. This intermission may perhaps rather be accounted for thus: in languid slates the blood is accumulated in the beginning of the aorta. The aorta will not therefore receive much blood from the heart, though it does contract;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236629353
  • 9781236629357