Observations, Chiefly Practical, on Some of the More Common Diseases of the Horse; Together with Remarks Upon the General Articles of Diet and the Ordinary Stable Management of That Animal

Observations, Chiefly Practical, on Some of the More Common Diseases of the Horse; Together with Remarks Upon the General Articles of Diet and the Ordinary Stable Management of That Animal

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1814 edition. Excerpt: ...fomented every two or three hours, with large flannel cloths dipped into water as hot as the hands can.bt: _ bornein it, for fifteen or twenty minutes at a time, and be gently? rubbed dry afterwards. Friction should be applied to the limbs, and as fast as they can be brought to their natural warmth they should be protected in that state by woollen cloths or soft hay-bands. If the symptoms be not decidedly relieved in the course of six or eight hours, take away from four to six quarts more blood, according. to the size of the Horse and the urgency of the case, and this ope ration, it may become necessary to repeat in five or six hours more, unless decided relief be obtained. But, if in the course of two or three hours after the first bleeding, the pawing and quickness of' breathing should encrease, and more especially, if the pulse be not somewhat slower, softer or fuller, a second bleeding sbould be had recourse to immediately, and instead of continuing the hot fomentations, the skin of the belly should be rubbed perfectly dry, and the entire surface of it should be either blistered or fired without delay. Wvhen the symptoms are extremely urgent, the latter mode of set ting up vehement external inflammation, which is the object we have in view, as it is by far the most expeditions, so for this reason it is I-most to be depended upon. lf the operation be perforn-ed with judgment, it may be done readily enough, without occasioning the smallest eventual blemish. The firing instrument should be broad and flat or slightly concave, and should be passed over the skin of the belly with a degree of pressure suflicient to excite considerable inflammation without producing sloughs in that integument. In recommending this severe and apparently...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236899865
  • 9781236899866