Observations, Anatomical, Physiological and Pathological, on the Pulmonary System; With Remarks on Some of the Diseases of the Lungs, Viz, on Haemorrhage, Wounds, Asthma, Catarrh, Croup, and Consumption; Tending to Establish a New

Observations, Anatomical, Physiological and Pathological, on the Pulmonary System; With Remarks on Some of the Diseases of the Lungs, Viz, on Haemorrhage, Wounds, Asthma, Catarrh, Croup, and Consumption; Tending to Establish a New

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1795 edition. Excerpt: ...until it had gotten to a certain size: but his own words seem to me to prove, 'ithat the chief seat of tubercle is in the air cells, agreeable to our notions. For he observes that, when tubercles have arrived at a size exceeding half an inch, they " have constantly a round opening made by a branch of the trachea." N-ow, how could this constantly happen if tubercles originated, as is commonly supposed, in the lateral connecting cellular structure? Are not the air cells the ultimate terminations of the tracheal or bronchia branches? They certainly 1 9. are t ( 1' idss ). are: and it hence appears evident that our' opisi-c nion recei-ves additional consirmation from this pathological fact. I t may be said that tubercle, according to our ideas of its Formation, may alsor arise in the common-cellular membraner It certainly may, as well as the different scrophulous tumours which happen in the common cellular membrane of other parts of the body z-but it must be granted that it will be much more apt to happen, and more easily produced, in a part where mucus is secreted, and where solid andheavy substances-may by inhalation be received and become nuclei, than-where' there is only the sine intersticial vapour. Supposing rhen ou-r ideaes, respecting the seat and origin of tubercle, to be well founded; let us next see how we ean account for the sormation and appearances-of this apparently glandul-siar body. ' _ If a particle of thickened mucus, -of coagulating lymph, -or of some heavy extraneous body, fhouldstagnate i-n the air cells, whatwill naturally follow? First, -we presume there will be more or less of irritation, and Consequent increased seeretion of mucus, or exudation oflymph; from which the original particle, whether mucus, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236967402
  • 9781236967404