Notices Illustrative of the Drame and Other Popular Amusements Chiefly in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century; Incidentally Illustrating Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Notices Illustrative of the Drame and Other Popular Amusements Chiefly in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century; Incidentally Illustrating Shakespeare and His Contemporaries : Extracted from the Camberlain's Accounts

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ...in "A Paper on Puppets," by Dr. Doran, in the " Gentleman's Magazine" for February, 1852, and also in the " Histoire des Marionettes," by M. Charles Magnin, in successive numbers of the "Revue des Deux Mondes," for 1850. Mr. Morley's entertaining " Memoirs of Bartholomew Fair" may also be consulted. From a very early period tumbling formed one of the most common pastimes of the English people. Struttl says that " dancing, tumbling, and balancing, with variety of other exercises requiring skill and agility, were originally included in the performances exhibited by the gleemen and the minstrels; and they remained attached to the profession of the joculator after he was separated from those who only retained the first branches of the minstrel's art, that is to say, poetry and music." And Mr. Wright, in his " History of Domestic Manners and Sentiments in England,"2 states that, in the middle ages, " the dinner was always accompanied by music, and itinerant minstrels, mountebanks, and performers of all descriptions were allowed free access to the hall to amuse the guests by their performances. These were intermixed with dancing and tumbling, and often with exhibitions of a very gross character, which, however, amid the looseness of mediaeval manners, appear to have excited no disgust." Nor were the feats of tumbling performed by the male sex only, for females also practised them, and both Strutt and Wright have given two illustrations copied from ancient MSS. representing Herodias displaying her feats of activity before Herod at the feast given by him; and which the medieeval writers took to be those of a regular wandering...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236884957
  • 9781236884954