Notes on Gearing; Prepared for the Use of Students in Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Notes on Gearing; Prepared for the Use of Students in Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...tables, showing limiting cases under certain given conditions, have been arranged from those given in the text. These cases were determined by careful calculation from diagrams: they may aid in determining the possibility of any assumed case without the construction of a diagram, a diagram being preferable, however, in any case where the conditions differ even a little from those given in the tables. 79. The tables (page 39) give the least-numbered spur wheels and the greatest-numbered annular wheels that will work with given pinions which have radial flanks. The tooth is taken equal to the space in all cases. In the case of spur wheels the table explains itself, minimum values being given in all cases. In annular wheels the greatest number of teeth for the annular wheel is given. The least number that can be driven is always one more than that on the pinion; the lowest numbers that can thus be used are 3 for the pinion and 4 for the wheel. In all the combinations given, the receding action can be secured only by the use of an intermediate TOOTH = SPACE. Greatest Nnm her of Teeth in Annular Wheel. 144 50 34 27 23 21 19 18 17 13 13 14 24 60 describing circle. The least number of teeth for the annular driver, since the flanks of the pinion are radial, will be % times that of the given pinion ( 77) whatever the arc of recess. The above limits are not put down in the tables. 80. In an interchangeable set of spur wheels with a constant describing circle, the limiting number of teeth for the annular wheels may be found without the use of a table, by taking into account the principles of 46, 47. If the diameter of the describing circle is equal to the radius of a pinion of 1'2 teeth, then the distance between centres (when the...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236790197
  • 9781236790194