Notes and Queries, Number 216, December 17, 1853 a Medium of Inter-Communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, Etc

Notes and Queries, Number 216, December 17, 1853 a Medium of Inter-Communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, Etc

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Excerpt: ...acid 1 drachm. Distilled water7 1 ounce. If the weather is warm, 6 drops of gallic acid to the 10 of aceto-nitrate will suffice, and enable the prepared excited paper to be kept longer. This exciting fluid may be applied either directly 599 by means of the glass rod, or by floating, as before, and then the glass rod. But if floating is resorted to, then a larger quantity must be prepared. As soon as it is applied the paper should be blotted off by means of blotting-paper (which should never be used more than once in this way, although preserved for other purposes), and put into the dark frames for use.8 It is not requisite that the paper should be perfectly dry. This exciting should be conducted by a very feeble light; the paper is much more sensitive than is generally supposed; in fact, it is then in a state to print from by the aid of gas or the light of a common lamp, and very agreeable positives are so produced by this negative mode of printing. I would advise the aceto-nitrate of silver and the solution of gallic acid to be kept in two bottles with wooden cases differing in their shape, so that they may not be mistaken when operating, in comparative darkness. A 1/4 of an ounce of gallic acid put into such a 3-ounce bottle, and quite filled up with distilled water as often as any is used, will serve a very long time. I would also recommend that the paper should be excited upon the morning of the day upon which it is intended to be used; no doubt the longer it is kept, the less active and less certain it becomes. I have, however, used it successfully eight days after excitement, and have a good negative produced at that length of time. The general medium time of exposure required is five minutes. In the negatives exhibited, the time has varied from three minutes to eight, the latter being when the day was very dull. The pictures should be developed by equal quantities of the aceto-nitrate of silver and the saturated solution of gallic acid, which.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236725794
  • 9781236725790