Northern Mythology, Comprising the Principal Popular Traditions and Superstitions of Scandinavia, North Germany and the Netherlands Volume 1

Northern Mythology, Comprising the Principal Popular Traditions and Superstitions of Scandinavia, North Germany and the Netherlands Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...frosty-mane. His other appellation, Fiiirsvartnir, may be rendered life-obscurer. Skinfaxi, the name of the horse of day, denotes shining-mane; his other name, Glad, brightness. Mundilfiiri has been derived from O. Nor. miindull, an aaris; a derivation, if to be relied on, which seems to indicate a knowledge of the motion of the heavens round the earth. The spots in the moon, which are here alluded to, require but little illustration3. Here they are children carrying water in a bucket, a superstition still preserved in the popular belief of the Swedes4. Other nations see in it a man with a dog, some a man with a bundle of brushwood, for having stolen which on a Sunday he was condemned to figure in the moon5, etc. Page 80. 2 Page 5. 3 Page 6. 4 Ling's Eddornas Sinnebildsleira, i. 78. 5 Lady Cynthia is thus described by Chaucer (Testam. of Cresceide, 260-263): --Her gite was gray and ful of spottis blake, And on her brest a chorle paintid ful even, Glen, the husband of the sun, is the Kymric word for sun. Her horses are Arvakr, the vigilant, and Alsvith, the all. burning, all-rapid. The sun is feminine and the moon masculine, because day is mild and friendly, night raw and stern; while in the south, day is burning and night the most pleasant. The father of Winter, Vindsval, denotes windy, cold. The father of Summer is Svasud, or mild, soft. Hraesvelg, the name of the north wind, represented as an eagle, signifies corpse-devourer1. Dwanrs AND MEN.---The gods assembled on Ida's plain2, etc. The maidens from Jiitunheim, were, without doubt, the maidens of fate or destiny, who craved the creation of the beings that should be subjected to them. Now, therefore, follows the creation of dwarfs and men. The subordinate powers of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236786556
  • 9781236786555