The North American Sylva; Or, a Description of the Forest Trees of the United States, Canada and Nova Scotia, Not Described in the Work of F.A. Michaux Volume 1

The North American Sylva; Or, a Description of the Forest Trees of the United States, Canada and Nova Scotia, Not Described in the Work of F.A. Michaux Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...very long, from 5 to 9 in a scale, with filaments which are hairy towards the base, and as well as the hairy, broad, cuneate, serrated scales, are of a bright golden-yellow. The female plant, at the time of flowering, appears to have smaller leaves than the male, and those on the branches which bear the catkin, are green on both surfaces for a considerable time; they are also but little acuminated: 5 or 6 leaves with their appropriate stipules grow out on the same branch, which terminates in a female spike. The scales of the catkin or spike are oblong or lance-oblong, and less hairy than in the staminiferous catkin. The germ is lanceolate, pedicellate and smooth, acuminated and terminated by a short bifid style, with 2 pubescent bifid stigmas. The capsule is likewise smooth, and contains seeds with a very long pappus, as abundant almost as on a seed of cotton. The wood is whitish and close-grained, and might probably be employed for the same purposes as that of the White Poplar, but the nearly uninhabited state of the country in Oregon, prevents the possibility of making any useful experiments. As an ornamental and hardy tree, however, it stands pre-eminent among all its fraternity, and well deserves to be introduced into pleasure grounds, where it would be perfectly hardy as far north as New York, or in any part of Great Britain. Plate XVII. A twig and leaf of the natural size. a. The female catkin. b. The male catkin. c. The male flower and scale of the catkin. d. The open capsule. LONG-LEAVED BAY WILLOW. SALIX Pentandra; foliis ellipticis acuminatis serratis glabris, petiolis superne glandulosis, amentis serotinis pentandris, germinibus lanceolatis glabris. Willd. Sp. pl. L c. Vahl. in Flora Danica, tab. 943. Host. Sal. Austr. 1. t 1. f. 2....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236537718
  • 9781236537713