Normal Schools and Other Institutions, Agencies, and Means Designed for the Professional Education of Teachers; United States and British Provinces Volume 1

Normal Schools and Other Institutions, Agencies, and Means Designed for the Professional Education of Teachers; United States and British Provinces Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ... for all the schools." This is readily conceded; but people generally admit t at half a loaf is better than no bread, especially if they are hungry. If we have a thousand teachers, it is much better that three hundred of' the number should be well qualified, than that all should be incompetent; and five hundred would be still better than three hundred, and seven hundred better than either, and the whole thousand best of all We must begin as well as we can, and go forward as fast as we are able; and not be like the poor fool who will not move at all, because the first step he takes from his own door will not land him at once in the place of his destination. The first step is a necessary preliminary to the second, and the second to the third, and so on till all the steps are taken, and the journey completed. The educated teacher will exert a reforming influence on those w o have not been so well prepared; he will elevate and enlarge their views of the duties of the profession, and greatly assist them in their endeavors after a more perfect qual1fication. He will also excite capable young men among his pupils to engage in the profession; for one of the greatest excitements of the young to engage in any business, is to sec a superior whom they respect in the successful rosecution of it. P Every well-educated teacher does much toward qualigying those who are already in the profession without suflicient preparation, an toward exciting others to engage in it; and thus, though the institution cannot supply nearly eachers enough for all the schools, yet all the schools will be better taug tin consequence of its mfluence. Moreover, a State mstitution would be the parent of many others, which woutlid graduallyharigp, as their necessity would be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 138 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 259g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236547616
  • 9781236547613