Nonlinear Acoustics

Nonlinear Acoustics : Theory and Applications

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Description

"Nonlinear Acoustics: Theory and Applications" is an introductory text on the theory and applications of nonlinear acoustics. This book develops the theory on nonlinear acoustics from physical principles. The first half of the book develops the physical concepts, mathematical models, and classical methods of solution that form the theoretical framework of nonlinear acoustics. Benchmark experiences are described and many applications are discussed in detail. The second half covers special topics and applications, both theory and experiment. The material is accessible to anyone familiar with the principles normally encountered in a basic course on the physical aspects of linear acoustics. Each chapter is written by experts in their respective fields. It includes basic theory and model equations developed from first principles; explains the extensive history of nonlinear acoustics and the Burger's equation; describes the analytical, perturbation, and numerical methods of solution; and introduces nonlinear waves in solids.
The applications included methods for: Determining the nonlinearity parameter; Suppression of sound by sound; Acoustic levitation and streaming; Sound beams and parametric arrays; Statistical phenomena; Four-Wave mixing; Phase conjugation; Biomedical effects; and, Propagation in the atmosphere, ocean, waveguides, relaxing fluids, and bubbly liquids.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 455 pages
  • 157.48 x 233.68 x 30.48mm | 725.74g
  • Academic Press Inc
  • San Diego, United States
  • English
  • b&w illustrations, references, index
  • 0123218608
  • 9780123218605

Table of contents

D.T. Blackstock, History of Nonlinear Acoustics: 1750s-1930s: Introduction. 1759-1860, The Classical Era. 1870-1910, Shock Waves. 1930s, Precursors of the Modern Era. References. R.T. Beyer, The Parameter B/A: Introduction. Definitions. Physical Interpretation of B/A. Determination of B/A. Nonlinearity in Isotropic Solids. Tables. References. M.F. Hamilton and C.L. Morfey, Model Equations: Introduction. Basic Equations. Lossless Theory. Approximations for Thermoviscous Fluids. Second-Order Wave Equation. Westervelt Equation. Burgers Equation. Generalized Burgers Equation. KZK Equation. References. D.T. Blackstock, M.F. Hamilton, and A.D. Pierce, Progressive Waves in Lossless and Lossy Fluids: Introduction. Losslessness Progressive Waves. Shock Waves. Weak Shock Theory. The Burgers Equation. Special Topics. References. M.F. Hamilton, Y.A. Il-nskii, and E.A. Zabolotskaya, Dispersion: Introduction. Weak Dispersion. Strong Dispersion. Acknowledgment. References. T.G. Wang and C.P. Lee, Radiation Pressure and Acoustic Levitation: Introduction. Radiation Pressure. Acoustic Levitation. References. W.L. Nyborg, Acoustic Streaming: Introduction. General Considerations. Solutions. Applications. References. M.F. Hamilton, Sound Beams: Introduction. Parabolic Wave Equation. Quasilinear Theory. A.N. Morris, Finite Amplitude Waves in Solids: Introduction. Equations of Nonlinear Elastodynamics. Longitudinal and Transverse Pane Waves. Acoustoelasticity: Stress Dependence of the Wave Speeds. Sound Beams in Solids. References. J.H. Ginsberg, Perturbation Methods: Background. Regular Perturbation Technique. Methodof Multiple Scales. Method of Renormalization. Radiation from a Vibrating Plate. Curvilinear Coordinates. Wave Groups. References. J.H. Ginsberg and M.F. Hamilton, Computational Methods: Introduction. One-Dimensional Waves. Directional Three-Dimensional Waves. General Time Domain Algorithm. References. C.L. Morfey and F.D. Cotaras, Propagation in Inhomogeneous Media (Ray Theory): Ray Theory and its Extension to Finite Amplitude Propagation. Examples of Nonlinear Propagation a Stationary Medium. Finite Amplitude Ray Propagation in Moving Media. Examples of Nonlinear Propagation in a Moving Medium. Review of Approximations. Acoustic Properties of Water and Seawater. S.N. Gurbatov and O.V. Rudenko, Statistical Phenomena:Introduction. Evolution Equation and Statistical Functions. Basic Phenomena in Nonlinear Noise Fields. Evolution of Quasi-Monochromatic Signals. Evolution of Broadband Spectra--Acoustic Turbulence. Interaction of a Regular Wave with Noise. Conclusions. References. H.J. Simpson and P.L. Marston, Parametric Layers, Four-Wave Mixing, and Wavefront Reversal: Introduction. Focused-Wave Production by Parametric Mixing in a Nonlinear Layer. Four-Wave Mixing Resulting from Responses to Radiation Pressure. Kinematic Processes and Miscellaneous Phase Conjugation Processes. Acknowledgment. References. E.L. Carstensen and D.R. Bacon, Biomedical Applications: Introduction. Acoustic Properties of Tissues. High Amplitude, Focused Fields of Medical Equipment. Predicting Fields in Tissues: The Derating Problem. Implications of Nonlinear Contributions to Radiation Forces and Acoustic Streaming. Lithotripsy. Pulsed Ultrasound. Acknowledgment. References. Subject Index.
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About M.F. Hamilton

Mark F. Hamilton and David T. Blackstock are Professors of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. Active in the series of International Symposia on Nonlinear Acoustics (ISNA), they were co-chairs of the 12th ISNA, held in 1990, and editors of the proceedings Frontiers of Nonlinear Acoustics (Elsevier). They have received various awards from the Acoustical Society of America for their research in nonlinear acoustics.Hamilton's interest in nonlinear acoustics began with his doctoral work under F.H. Fenlon at Pennsylvania State University. As the Acoustical Society's F.V. Hunt Postdoctoral Fellow in 19831984, he spent the year at the Mathematics Institute of the University of Bergen in Norway. He followed this with a second year of postdoctoral study at Applied Research Laboratories of the University of Texas at Austin. He joined the Mechanical Engineering faculty of UT at Austin in 1985. He is well know in nonlinear acoustics for his research on sound beams, waveguides, computational methods, and waves in solids.Blackstock also began his research on nonlinear acoustics as a doctoral student, in F.V. Hunt's laboratory at Harvard University. He spent the decade of the 1960s in Rochester, New York: three years at General Dynamics/Electronics and seven years in theUniversity of Rochester's Electrical Engineering Department. Since 1970 he has been at the University of Texas at Austin. Currently he holds a joint appointment at Applied Research Laboratories and the Mechanical Engineering Department. His research in nonlinear acoustics has been on the Burgers equation, weak shock theory, and various applications such as sonic boom, finite-amplitude noise, and medical ultrasonics. Mark F. Hamilton and David T. Blackstock are Professors of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. Active in the series of International Symposia on Nonlinear Acoustics (ISNA), they were co-chairs of the 12th ISNA, held in 1990, and editors of the proceedings Frontiers of Nonlinear Acoustics (Elsevier). They have receivedvarious awards from the Acoustical Society of America for their research in nonlinear acoustics.Hamilton's interest in nonlinear acoustics began with his doctoral work under F.H. Fenlon at Pennsylvania State University. As the Acoustical Society's F.V. Hunt Postdoctoral Fellow in 19831984, he spent the year at the Mathematics Institute of the University of Bergen in Norway. He followed this with a second year of postdoctoral study at Applied Research Laboratories of the University of Texas at Austin. He joined the Mechanical Engineering faculty of UT at Austin in 1985. He is well know in nonlinear acoustics for his research on sound beams, waveguides, computational methods, and waves in solids.Blackstock also began his research on nonlinear acoustics as a doctoral student, in F.V. Hunt's laboratory at Harvard University. He spent the decade of the 1960s in Rochester, New York: three years at General Dynamics/Electronics and seven years in theUniversity of Rochester's Electrical Engineering Department. Since 1970 he has been at the University of Texas at Austin. Currently he holds a joint appointment at Applied Research Laboratories and the Mechanical Engineering Department. His research in nonlinear acoustics has been on the Burgers equation, weak shock theory, and various applications such as sonic boom, finite-amplitude noise, and medical ultrasonics.
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