Nineteenth-century Britain

Nineteenth-century Britain : England, Scotland and Wales - The Making of a Nation

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Description

Communications across Britain in the 19th century improved enormously through the spread of the railways, penny post, newspapers and increased affluence which enabled more people to take holidays. This study examines the various aspects which served to unite or divide the regions, such as the role of the Church, patterns of eating and drinking, the political system, commercial development, the educational system, language, literature and music. The author concludes that a "British" nation consolidated through the century, which, although not uniform in character, held together during the supreme test of World War I under the political guidance of a Welshman whose first language was not English and the spiritual guidance of an Archbishop of Canterbury who was a Scot. Professor Robbins has written several historical studies including "The First World War" and "The Eclipse of a Great Power: Modern Britain 1870-1975".show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 206 pages
  • 129 x 196 x 14mm | 153g
  • Oxford University Press
  • Oxford Paperbacks
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • New edition
  • New edition
  • index
  • 0192851225
  • 9780192851222

Table of contents

The identity of Britain; language, literature and music - links and barriers; church, chapel and the fragmentation of faith; the business of politics and the politics of business; education, science and the moulding of the mind; sport, patriotism and the will to win.show more

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