The Nineteenth Century; Its History, Progress, and Marvelous Achievements the Wonderful Story of the World for One Hundred Yearsembellished with Nearl

The Nineteenth Century; Its History, Progress, and Marvelous Achievements the Wonderful Story of the World for One Hundred Yearsembellished with Nearl

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...of the Nationals, where Generals Slocum and Howard were in command, the former on Culp's Hill, and the latter on Cemetery Hill. Against these a large portion of Ewell's corps had been sent. The latter were pushed back by Howard, but seized and occupied the works of Slocum, on the extreme right of Culp's Hill, that night. The battle ended at sunset on the left, but it was continued until about ten o'clock that night on the right. Slocum renewed the battle at four o'clock on the morning of the 3d, when he drove the Confederates out of his line after a hard struggle for four hours. There he held Ewell in check, while the contest raged elsewhere. Lee, perceiving the Little Round Top--a steep, rocky eminence--to be impregnable, proceeded, at a little past noon, to attack the more vulnerable centre. Upon this he opened one hundred and forty-five heavy cannon, chiefly against Cemetery Hill and its vicinity, occupied by Meade's centre. A hundred National great guns quickly answered; and for two hours a fearful cannonade that shook the country around was kept up. Then the Confederates, in heavy columns, preceded by a cloud of skirmishers, swept over the plain and assailed the National line with great fury. It was intended by Lee to give a crushing blow that should ensure victory. A terrible struggle followed that covered the ground with the slain--men and horses. At sunset the Confederates were repulsed at all points; and the decisive battle of Gettysburg ended in triumph for the Army of the Potomac. In that fearful struggle, the Nationals lost in killed, wounded, and missing, over twenty-three thousand men; the Confederates lost about thirty thousand, including fourteen thousand prisoners. On the evening of the day of the battle (July 4, 1863), Lee began...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 220 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236642252
  • 9781236642257