New Zealand Neuroptera; A Popular Introduction to the Life and Habits of May-Flies, Dragon-Flies, Caddis-Flies and Allied Insects Inhabiting New Zeala

New Zealand Neuroptera; A Popular Introduction to the Life and Habits of May-Flies, Dragon-Flies, Caddis-Flies and Allied Insects Inhabiting New Zeala

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...wet mud, or sand, beneath the stone, and carefully smooths it within. During the course of a few days the larva becomes somewhat shrivelled, and after a week or so sheds its skin and appears as a pupa. This habit of leaving the water, just at the time when the shrinkage in the volume of the rivers occurs, is no doubt very beneficial to the insect as, unlike many other neuropterous pupae, it is able to imbibe air and thus escape destruction by drought.. The pupa of C. diversus, in its natural curved position, measures about 1 inch in length. Its limbs closely resemble those of the perfect insect, except the wings which are, of course, rudimentary. The larval gills are replaced by a series of wart-like projections, situated on each side of the first eight segments of the abdomen. This pupa is not endowed with the power of locomotion until shortly before it undergoes its final transformation. About this time the legs are gradually stretched out, and in a few days are sufficiently powerful to enable the insect to leave its prison in the earth and walk about. Shortly afterwards the skin is cast off, and the perfect fly ascends the stem of some plant, and dries and expands its wings. The imago appears from the middle of November until the middle of January. It is seldom seen in the daytime, but is usually observed at evening dusk, flying in rather a slow and laborious manner. It is sometimes fairly abundant, especially in the neighbourhood of rivers. When on the wing this large insect is not conspicuous, unless seen against the bright glow of the evening sky; and it is still less noticeable in the daytime whilst resting on tree-trunks or amongst foliage. Family IX.--Panorpidje--SCORPION-FLIES. No species belonging to this family have been found in New...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236565258
  • 9781236565259