New York; Old & New Section 1. New Amsterdam and Its Burghers. Section 2. the Sway of the English. Section 3. New York as a Free City Volume 1

New York; Old & New Section 1. New Amsterdam and Its Burghers. Section 2. the Sway of the English. Section 3. New York as a Free City Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ...it with a betrayal of its trust. A swift fever had ere this made an end of Townshend, but not before the acts of which he was the author had again arrayed all the colonies in open hostility to the crown. Leading merchants in most of the towns once more agreed, as in the case of the Stamp Act, to import no English goods until the Townshend acts should be repealed; and so faithfully was the agreement kept that trade with England was brought almost to a standstill. This bred distress among those interested over sea; the merchants of London, seeing ruin ahead of them, earnestly petitioned Parliament that the new taxes be taken off; and after long discussion Lord North, who was now at the head of the exchequer, promised the repeal of all of the Townshend acts except the one which laid a duty on tea. That was the least of the taxes, and the king insisted upon its retention, to save the principle of the bill and show that Parliament had not reconsidered its right to tax the colonies. An ominous thing had happened the while in New York. Ever since the passage of the Stamp Act there had been bad blood between the soldiers and the citizens, many of whom were quartered in barracks standing on the line of Chambers Street, and were thus brought in daily contact with the people. The liberty-pole on the Common set up in 1766 had quickly become the rallying-point of the patriots, and, by the same token, an eyesore to the soldiers. Thrice the pole was cut down by the British troops, and as many times restored by the Sons of Liberty. A fourth pole, fastened with iron braces, held its place until the night of January 16, 1770, when a party of the Sixteenth Regiment cut it down, hewed it into pieces, and piled the fragments in front of Montagne's Tavern, in Broadway...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236515161
  • 9781236515162