New York Criminal Reports; Reports of Cases Decided in All the Courts of the State of New York Involving Questions of Criminal Law and Practice, with Notes and References Volume 18

New York Criminal Reports; Reports of Cases Decided in All the Courts of the State of New York Involving Questions of Criminal Law and Practice, with Notes and References Volume 18

By (author) 

List price: US$22.41

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...can treat the taking as a crime, or qualify any of the acts done by invitation as criminal. Vhat is authorized to be done is no wrong in law to the instigator." In Love v. People (160 Ill. 501) the court said: "Acts, otherwise criminal, done by a party against property at the instigation and by the encouragement of a detective, who acts in pursuance of a plan previously arranged with the owner of the property, do not constitute a crime. If he could make the criminal and induce the commission of the crime and can-re the arrest of the actor, or throw around him a web of circumstances that would lead to a conviction, it would redound to the glory of his chief and cause his advancement. With him the end justified the means, and the reputation of the agency to which he belonged and his own advancement were apparently his object. Such means and agents are more dangerous to the welfare of society than.are the crimes they were intended to detect and the criminals they were to arrest. Strong men are sometimes unprepared to cope with temptation and resist encouragement to evil when finuicially embarrassed and impoverished. A contemplated crime may never be developed into a consummated act. To stimulate unlawful intentions for the purpose and with the motive of bringing them to maturity so the consequent crime may be punished is a dangerous practice. It is safer law and sounder morals to hold, where one arranged to have a crime committed against his property or himself, and knows that an attempt is to be made to encourage others to commit the act by one acting in concert with such cwner, that no crime is thus committed. The owner and his agent may wait passively for the would-be criminal to perpetrate the offense, and each and every...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 186 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 340g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236913655
  • 9781236913654