The New World and the New Book; An Address, Delivered Before the Nineteenth Century Club of New York City, Ja. 15, 1891; With Kindred Essays

The New World and the New Book; An Address, Delivered Before the Nineteenth Century Club of New York City, Ja. 15, 1891; With Kindred Essays

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...and flexible training, with large vistas of knowledge. They like to see in him that " full man " who is made, as Lord Bacon says, by "reading." One main reason why Homer and Plato and Horace and even Dante seem to supply more of this kind of fulness than can be got from an equivalent study of Balzac and Ruskin, is doubtless because the older authors are remoter, and so make the vista look more wide. The vaster the better; but there must be enough of it, at least, to convey a distinct sensation of background. Of course, when this background obtrudes itself into the foreground, it becomes intolerable; and such books as Burton's " Anatomy of Melancholy " are tiresome, because they are all made up of background, and that of the craggiest description; but, after all, the books which offer only foreground are also insufficient. I do not see how any one can read the essays of Howells and James and Burroughs, for instance, after reading those of Emerson or Lowell or Thoreau, without noticing in the younger trio a somewhat narrowed range of allusion and illustration; a little deficiency in that mellow richness of soil which can be made only out of the fallen leaves of many successive vegetations; a want, in fact, of background. It is to be readily admitted that there is no magic in a college, and that any writer who has a vast love of knowledge may secure his background for himself, as did, for example, Theodore Parker. Yet he cannot obtain it without what is, in some sense, the equivalent of a college; long early years spent in various studies, and especially in those liberal pursuits formerly known as the Humanities. No doubt there is much material accessible in other ways, as by wide travel, or even in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236794508
  • 9781236794505